171
Global
Height rank

Jiangxi Nanchang Greenland Central Plaza, Parcel A

Nanchang
Height
1
To Tip:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).

303 m / 994 ft
2
Architectural:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

303 m / 994 ft
3
Occupied:

Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.

245 m / 804 ft
Floors
Above Ground

The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

59
Below Ground

The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

4
1 2 3 Jiangxi Nanchang Greenland Central Plaza, Parcel A Outline
Height 303.0 m / 994 ft
Floors 59
Official Name
The current legal building name.

Jiangxi Nanchang Greenland Central Plaza, Parcel A

Other Names
Other names the building has commonly been known as, including former names, common informal names, local names, etc.

Greenland Center NGC Tower 1

Name of Complex
A complex is a group of buildings which are designed and built as pieces of a greater development.

Jiangxi Nanchang Greenland Central Plaza

Type
CTBUH collects data on two major types of tall structures: 'Buildings' and 'Telecommunications / Observation Towers.' A 'Building' is a structure where at least 50% of the height is occupied by usable floor area. A 'Telecommunications / Observation Tower' is a structure where less than 50% of the structure's height is occupied by usable floor area. Only 'Buildings' are eligible for the CTBUH 'Tallest Buildings' lists.

Building

Status
Completed
Architecturally Topped Out
Structurally Topped Out
Under Construction
Proposed
On Hold
Never Completed
Vision
Competition Entry
Canceled
Proposed Renovation
Under Renovation
Renovated
Under Demolition
Demolished

Completed

Completion

2015

Country
The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of Country, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

China

City
The CTBUH follows the United Nations's definition of City, and thus uses the lists and codes established by that organization.

Nanchang

Function
A single-function tall building is defined as one where 85% or more of its usable floor area is dedicated to a single usage. Thus a building with 90% office floor area would be said to be an "office" building, irrespective of other minor functions it may also contain.

A mixed-use tall building contains two or more functions (or uses), where each of the functions occupy a significant proportion of the tower's total space. Support areas such as car parks and mechanical plant space do not constitute mixed-use functions. Functions are denoted on CTBUH "Tallest Building" lists in descending order, e.g., "hotel/office" indicates hotel function above office function.

office

Structural Material
Steel
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from steel. Note that a building of steel construction with a floor system of concrete planks or concrete slab on top of steel beams is still considered a “steel” structure as the concrete elements are not acting as the primary structure.

Reinforced Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning systems are constructed from concrete which has been cast in place and utilizes steel reinforcement bars.

Precast Concrete
Both the main vertical/lateral structural elements and the floor spanning system are constructed from steel reinforced concrete which has been precast as individual components and assembled together on-site.

Mixed-Structure
Utilizes distinct systems (e.g. steel, concrete, timber), one on top of the other. For example, a steel/concrete indicates a steel structural system located on top of a concrete structural system, with the opposite true of concrete/steel.

Composite
A combination of materials (e.g. steel, concrete, timber) are used together in the main structural elements. Examples include buildings which utilize: steel columns with a floor system of reinforced concrete beams; a steel frame system with a concrete core; concrete-encased steel columns; concrete-filled steel tubes; etc. Where known, the CTBUH database breaks out the materials used in a composite building’s core, columns, and floor spanning separately.

composite

Core
Reinforced Concrete
Columns
Concrete Encased Steel
Floor Spanning
Steel
Height
Architectural
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, flag poles or other functional-technical equipment. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is employed to define the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) rankings of the "World's Tallest Buildings."

303.0 m / 994 ft

To Tip
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of the highest element (i.e., including antennae, flagpoles, signage and other functional-technical equipment).
303.0 m / 994 ft
Occupied
Height is measured from the level of the lowest, significant, open-air, pedestrian entrance to the highest occupied floor within the building.
245.0 m / 804 ft
Floors Above Ground
The number of floors above ground should include the ground floor level and be the number of main floors above ground, including any significant mezzanine floors and major mechanical plant floors. Mechanical mezzanines should not be included if they have a significantly smaller floor area than the major floors below. Similarly, mechanical penthouses or plant rooms protruding above the general roof area should not be counted. Note: CTBUH floor counts may differ from published accounts, as it is common in some regions of the world for certain floor levels not to be included (e.g., the level 4, 14, 24, etc. in Hong Kong).

59

Floors Below Ground
The number of floors below ground should include all major floors located below the ground floor level.

4

# of Parking Spaces
Number of Parking Spaces refers to the total number of car parking spaces contained within a particular building.

771

# of Elevators
Number of Elevators refers to the total number of elevator cars (not shafts) contained within a particular building (including public, private and freight elevators).

20

Top Elevator Speed
Top Elevator Speed refers to the top speed capable of being achieved by an elevator within a particular building, measured in meters per second.

8 m/s

Tower GFA
Tower GFA refers to the total gross floor area within the tower footprint, not including adjoining podiums, connected buildings or other towers within the development.

110,000 m² / 1,184,030 ft²

Rankings
#
171
Tallest in the World
#
102
Tallest in Asia
#
86
Tallest in China
#
1
Tallest in Nanchang
#
64
Tallest Office Building in the World
#
42
Tallest Office Building in Asia
#
37
Tallest Office Building in China
#
1
Tallest Office Building in Nanchang
#
101
Tallest Composite Building in the World
#
84
Tallest Composite Building in Asia
#
77
Tallest Composite Building in China
#
1
Tallest Composite Building in Nanchang
Construction Schedule
2010

Proposed

2012

Construction Start

2015

Completed

Architect
Design

Usually involved in the front end design, with a "typical" condition being that of a leadership role through either Schematic Design or Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Architect of Record

Usually takes on the balance of the architectural effort not executed by the "Design Architect," typically responsible for the construction documents, conforming to local codes, etc. May often be referred to as "Executive," "Associate," or "Local" Architect, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Architect of Record" exclusively.

Structural Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

MEP Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Other Consultant

Other Consultant refers to other organizations which provided significant consultation services for a building project (e.g. wind consultants, environmental consultants, fire and life safety consultants, etc).

Façade

These are firms that consult on the design of a building's façade. May often be referred to as "Cladding," "Envelope," "Exterior Wall," or "Curtain Wall" Consultant, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Façade Consultant" exclusively.

Landscape
Vertical Transportation
Wind
Owner/Developer
Greenland Group
Architect
Design

Usually involved in the front end design, with a "typical" condition being that of a leadership role through either Schematic Design or Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Architect of Record

Usually takes on the balance of the architectural effort not executed by the "Design Architect," typically responsible for the construction documents, conforming to local codes, etc. May often be referred to as "Executive," "Associate," or "Local" Architect, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Architect of Record" exclusively.

Structural Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

MEP Engineer
Design

The Design Engineer is usually involved in the front end design, typically taking the leadership role in the Schematic Design and Design Development, and then a monitoring role through the CD and CA phases.

Other Consultant

Other Consultant refers to other organizations which provided significant consultation services for a building project (e.g. wind consultants, environmental consultants, fire and life safety consultants, etc).

Acoustics
Shen Milsom Wilke, Inc.
Façade

These are firms that consult on the design of a building's façade. May often be referred to as "Cladding," "Envelope," "Exterior Wall," or "Curtain Wall" Consultant, however, for consistency CTBUH uses the term "Façade Consultant" exclusively.

Landscape
Lighting
Kaplan Gehring McCarrol Architectural Lighting, Inc
Vertical Transportation
Wind
Material Supplier

Material Supplier refers to organizations which supplied significant systems/materials for a building project (e.g. elevator suppliers, facade suppliers, etc).

Cladding
Jangho Group Co., Ltd.
Elevator
Sematic S.r.l.

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Best Tall Building China 2016 China Distinction

2016 CTBUH Awards

Best Tall Building Asia & Australasia 2016 Award of Excellence

2016 CTBUH Awards

CTBUH Initiatives

2016 China Awards Symposium, Ceremony & Dinner

13 May 2016 - Awards Conference

CITAB-CTBUH Name 2016 China Tall Building Award Recipients

25 February 2016 - CTBUH News

Research

17 October 2016

SOM and China: Evolving Skyscraper Design Amid Rapid Urban Growth

Scott Duncan & Yue Zhu, SOM

China’s rapid urban and economic growth has challenged designers, engineers, and planners to innovate and collaborate to meet the needs of a changing country. Skidmore,...

About Jiangxi Nanchang Greenland Central Plaza, Parcel A

Located across the wide Ganjiang River from the historic center of Nanchang, the Jiangxi Nanchang Greenland Central Plaza, Parcel A and its identical twin tower became the city’s first supertall buildings upon their completion in 2015. Initially planned to top out at 289 meters, the design was then altered midway through construction to reach beyond the 300 meter mark, presenting a significant challenge to the design team. Through adding height to the buildings, the crowns were then sculpted into a series of concave curves and clad with operable glass louvers, opening to allow prevailing winds to pass through the top of the structure, reducing overall loading on the tower structure.

The bases of the towers are aligned to the street with a square ground floor plan featuring rounded corners. As the towers rise, the floorplate is rotated a total of 45 degrees, maximizing views of the nearby riverfront. The rounded corners become more pronounced as the towers rise, blending with the concave indentations of the uppermost floors, creating a tower form which transitions from rigid to organic and is clad in a sleek glass curtain wall which appears to flow across the exterior like a wave. Many of the glass panes as such are not flat and designers took advantage of a newly created production method known as ‘cold bending’ to form the glass panes into the desired specifications of the complex façade.

The base of the towers is made up of a large open lobby, with a highly transparent glass exterior suspended by a grid of cables wrapping the ground floor. This level of clear glass then transitions seamlessly into the blue tinted curtain wall for the remainder of the tower. The main entrances are marked by large stainless steel canopies suspended from freestanding arches by a weave of cables.

The towers flank a view corridor running from a public park, through the center of the complex where the towers are spaced at 100 meters apart and onward towards a street to the northwest. The integrated design relationship with the surrounding context should ensure these towers remain a key focal point in the Nanchang skyline for many years to come.

CTBUH Awards & Distinctions

Best Tall Building China 2016 China Distinction

2016 CTBUH Awards

Best Tall Building Asia & Australasia 2016 Award of Excellence

2016 CTBUH Awards

17 October 2016

SOM and China: Evolving Skyscraper Design Amid Rapid Urban Growth

Scott Duncan & Yue Zhu, SOM

China’s rapid urban and economic growth has challenged designers, engineers, and planners to innovate and collaborate to meet the needs of a changing country. Skidmore,...

19 January 2016

Year in Review: Tall Trends of 2015

Jason Gabel, Marty Carver & Marshall Gerometta, CTBUH

CTBUH has determined that 106 buildings of 200 meters’ height or greater were completed around the world in 2015 – setting a new record for...

23 September 2012

Case Study: Greenland's Suzhou Center, Wujiang

Ross Wimer, William Baker, Mark Nagis & Aaron Mazeika, SOM

At 358 meters, Greenland Group Suzhou Center marks the Wujiang waterfront with an aerodynamic form that has a unique presence, while accommodating its program with...

13 May 2016

The inaugural CITAB-CTBUH China Tall Building Awards were held at Shanghai Tower culminating with Bund SOHO winning China Best Tall Building Overall Award.

25 February 2016

CITAB-CTBUH Name 2016 China Tall Building Award Recipients

CITAB and CTBUH are pleased to announce the award recipients for the inaugural CITAB-CTBUH 2016 China Tall Building Awards.

19 January 2016

CTBUH Releases Year in Review: Tall Trends of 2015

CTBUH has determined that 106 buildings of 200 meters’ height or greater were completed around the world in 2015 – setting a new record for annual tall building completions.